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Sir Ababol Remastered Released for Free on NES

Sir Ababol has appeared on many systems over the years, initially being released on the ZX Spectrum in 2010, quickly followed by an Amstrad CPC version, then the Commodore 64 in 2012, and finally on the NES in 2013. Fast forward to 2017 and the Mojon Twins have updated their NES game and have made it available as a free download with the release of Sir Ababol Remastered.

The game’s plot follows that of Mr. Ababol, a young crusader in the 11th Century who hails from “Manchester City”–presumably the city and not the football team who go by the name “Manchester City”. Upon recovering from a nasty fall, Ababol discovered that he had lost his sword and, without it, he can not continue his crusade through the world. Confused and dazed, Ababol treks through the land in search of his sword, all the while avoiding the locals with the aim to finally reach his destination of Jerusalem.

What we have here is classic platform adventuring with the player guiding Ababol through the various levels in a bid to collect 24 ababol flowers. Finding keys is also needed to progress through the levels, gaining access to previously unavailable areas. There are some nasty locals roaming around in the levels, but can be taken out by jumping on them.

Having been developed for the crowdfunding campaign on Verkami–from which the game was given a physical release–the Mojon Twins have returned to their first NES effort, making many updates and improvements. The gameplay has been improved, the map has been adjusted, some colors have been changed, music has been optimized, scrolling has been improved, and other surprises and special characters have been added.

The Mojon Twins previously made another of their Verkami funded games–Mega Cheril Perils–available as a free download, and have promised to continue releasing the other titles at a later date. In the meantime, Sir Ababol Remastered can be downloaded for free from The Mojon Twins’ website, where the source code can also be found.

 

Neil Reive

An avid retrogamer who has worked on various projects, magazines, and fanzines. He started his videogaming journey with the Amstrad CPC464 computer before moving onto a Commodore 64, then the Sega Mega Drive, followed by a multitude of PCs.

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